Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Start Here

Can’t Believe Its Allergy Free!” is the result of years of research and experimentation to create tasty, healthy, allergy free food for  my little grandson . . . .  (Click here to read more About this blog) 

 

What’s New
>>>>
Hearty Ham and Cheese Bake
Cream of Rice Cake 
Gluten Free Donuts 
Tasty Chicken Risotto      
Gluten Free Chapati
      
 

Find my kid tested and family friendly recipes in these categories.

Cupcake Cakes Cookies and Deserts
Chapati Indian Recipes
ChickenLegs Meat and Poultry
Salads Salads and Sides
Soups Soups
Potato The Popular Potato

 

All recipes in Ready To Print format are stored in PDF files on SkyDrive.

To see these Recipes Click Here.

We usually turn to rice when confronted with wheat allergy, or the need to stay away from gluten.  Rice flour is the base of most cake, cookie, bread and all purpose gluten free flour mixes.  But rice does not provide great nutrition and cakes can be quite crumbly, especially when made egg free.  I have combined some amazingly nutritious gluten free flours—Amaranth, Sorghum, Quinoa, and Oats with a starch for binding, to produce fantastic cakes, cookies, pie crusts, Indian rotis and just about anything that wheat flour can make.  These flours are available in most specialty food stores and are becoming increasingly available in mainstream stores in the US. You can also find Amaranth, the Indian ‘Rajgira’, and Sorghum (‘Jowar” in India) in all Indian stores.

Grandma’s Gluten Free Flour Mix

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup amaranth flour
  • 1 cup sorghum flour
  • 1 cup quinoa flour
  • 1 cup rice flour
  • 1 cup oat flour (just grind one minute quick cooking oatmeal in a dry grinder)
  • 1/2 cup corn-starch (also called corn flour in some parts of the world)
  • 1and 2/3 teaspoon xanthan gum/ guar gum.
  • 1 level teaspoon salt.
  • Note:  If oats do not suit,, use 1 cup of cornstarch / tapioca starch 

Method:

  • In a large bowl, mix all flours well, taking care that bowl and mixing spoons are dry.
  • Add salt and xanthan gum and mix well.
  • Make double the quantity, or more, and store in dry, airtight jars.
  • To retain freshness, store in fridge.

Baking time for gluten free flour is a little more than the time required for baking with wheat flour

In the absence of Egg Replacer, use—3 Tablespoons water, 3 Tablespoons oil and 2 level teaspoons baking powder, mixed together.  this mixture is equivalent to 2 eggs.

Note

I stay away from soy, as it is an established allergenic food.  However, if soy is not an allergy issue, use 1/2 cup soy flour in place of quinoa flour, which may not be available in all places.  Quinoa is protein rich and soy is a good substitute But, if soy is a problem food, and there is no quinoa, make the flour mix without quinoa/soy.  Add 1 1/3  teaspoon xanthan/guar gum.  If the gums are not easy to obtain, you could omit them.   They add that extra bit of stickiness, and give a slightly better ‘stretch’ quality to the dough.  Increase the quantity of oat flour by 1/2 cup and and also add 1/2 cup more of corn starch (cornflour).  This will enhance the binding quality of dough, prevent crumbling of baked goods., and will help in rolling out chapatis etc. more efficiently

Fact Files on the Ingredients

Amaranth

This is an excellent source of protein, and is high in certain amino acids which are usually found only in animal foods.It is loaded with iron (a 100 g serving gives 50% of daily requirement based on a 2000 cal. diet). It is also a good source of calcium, vitamins, minerals and fiber.. Actually, amaranth is not a grain, but is the seed of a plant that is grown for its nutritious leaves as well. Toasted amaranth seeds can be eaten as breakfast cereal. The name ‘amaranth’ itself comes from the Latin root word, ‘amar’, as also the similar Sanskrit word, which means ‘immortal’.

Sorghum

This is among the oldest known grains and is also rich in protein, iron, calcium and potassium. Since it metabolizes slowly, it is possibly beneficial to diabetics as well. It is a good addition in any baking mix, as it does not have an intrusive flavor or color. It has been a staple food in Africa and India for centuries.

Quinoa

This is often described by nutritionists as the ‘super grain’. The National Academy of Science describes quinoa as ‘the most nearly perfect source of protein from the vegetable kingdom’. Ancient Incas called it the ‘mother grain.’ It has nine essential amino acids, has more calcium than milk, is high in iron, minerals, micronutrients, Vitamin E and some of the B group vitamins.

Oats

Oats are actually gluten free, but there is some chance of cross contamination as they are sometimes grown in proximity to, or in rotation with wheat. Cross contamination can occur during the milling and transportation process as well. If gluten free oats are available, go ahead as they have a good binding quality, are high in fiber , and contain some amount of iron and protein.

Others

Xanthan gum and other gums such as guar gum and locust bean gum are gluten free and help to give gluten free flour a spongy, elastic texture that gluten containing flours usually provide.

Corn-starch is not only a thickener to be used in soups and sauces, but also has a great binding quality. other starches such as tapioca starch, potato starch or arrowroot flour may also be used in place of corn starch.

SPICE IT UP!

Variety and the Spices of life

Spices are the best protective foods that Nature has given us.  In a broad sense, the word ‘spices’ encompasses a wide spectrum of herbs, roots, dried seeds, buds, tubers, rhizomes, barks and all sorts of other plant products.

Since ancient times, spices have been valued for their healing properties, and are of immense preservative value. Traders have braved the oceans to buy spices from the exotic lands of the East. Queen Isabella of Spain sent Christopher Columbus to find a newer, safer sea route to India to facilitate the trade of spices, among other goods.

Spices have great antioxidant properties, and are rich in vitamins and minerals.  They help to cleanse the blood, build tissues, prevent disease and aid in digestion.  The valuable micronutrients that spices have in them are also easily assimilated in the body.

Spices like garlic, onion, ginger, turmeric, cinnamon, thyme and basil can kill bacteria.  Scientists claim that over 75% bacteria in food are killed by spices.  When a Kansas State University microbiologist cooked a pound of hamburger with 1/4 teaspoon of garlic powder, he found that it had 90% fewer pathogens that meat cooked without spices.

Kids with food allergies and sensitivities could react to artificial preservatives and flavor enhancers.  What can be better that using nature’s flavorful preservatives, which are beneficial in so many ways.  Food thus enriched hardly needs the high sodium and high fat condiments as accompaniments.  Just cook the healthy way and Spice it Up!

Watch for my write ups on different spices which are commonly used.

Apples, pumpkins and ghostly nights….Halloween is here. Serve this fantastically tasty and easy apple dessert after trick and treating is done, to top off a special meal. This one is truly quick, simple and nourishing. Actually it’s a great dessert for any occasion…. Divali included!

Ingredients

6 medium size cooking apples. (good to have a sour variety)

4 Tablespoons dates, pitted and chopped

3 Tablespoons seedless raisins

Juice of 1 orange

Juice of 1 lemons/limes. Use 2 limes if small in size.

6 level Tablespoons brown sugar

Cream for serving.

Method

Pre heat oven to 350 F or 175 C

Wash apples, peel and core each one. If you are not using a corer, gently core with a knife to form and hollow and remove center.

Place in an ovenproof dish.

Sprinkle with lemon/lime juice.

Mix orange juice with the chopped dates and raisins.

Spoon the mixture into each apple hollow. Stuff it in as tightly as possible to get as much of it inside as possible. Add a few more dates and raisins if required.

Sprinkle liberally with brown sugar. Use a little more if required.

Bake for 40 minutes or until soft.

Serve hot with cream or ice cream.

Simply delicious!!!

 

This is a great variation of the wheat and egg free basic chocolate cake.  Orange gives a zesty, tangy, delightful flavor….very enjoyable at tea time, after school or even as a dessert or snack addition to school lunch.

 

Tea time orange cake

 

Ingredients

2 cups Grandma’s Gluten Free Flour Mix

3/4 can condensed milk (a little over 10 ounces)

1 stick (4 ounces) butter

2-3 Tablespoons grated orange zest (gently grate orange zest without including the white portion beneath)

3/4 cup fizzy orange drink (Fanta, for example)

2 level teaspoons baking powder

1 level teaspoon baking soda

1 teaspoon vanilla extract.

A few drops of yellow food color.

 

Method

Pre heat oven to 350 degrees F (approx 180 C)

In a medium bowl, sift all dry ingredients together (flour, baking powder and baking soda)

In a large bowl pour condensed milk.

Add melted butter and whisk together.

Add orange zest and vanilla extract, and mix well.

Pour in the fizzy orange drink slowly, mixing with a spoon as you pour.

Fold in dry ingredients, a few tablespoons at a time, ensuring that there are no lumps. If batter feels too thick,add a couple of tablespoons more or orange drink.

Mix well using a hand mixer for a couple of minutes.

Transfer into a 9” bundt pan or use two medium loaf pans, (8”x4”)

Bake for 45 minutes or until cake is a rich golden color, and knife comes out clean.

Simply delicious!

Moong Dal Vadas

Many people I know are allergic to chana dal (chick pea flour). One really doesn’t lose out that much.  Try these yummy moong dal vadas…they are as tasty, crunchier and lighter than the chana dal ones.  Once you have made these, you will want to make them again and again, whether allergic to chana dal or not.

 

moong dal vada

 

Ingredients

1 cup moong dal

1 cup lightly packed grated zucchini or finely chopped cabbage

1/3 cup finely chopped onion

2 Tablespoons or more chopped fresh cilantro (coriander)

Finely chopped green chillies to taste

1 teaspoon whole cumin seed

1 level teaspoon cumin seed (jeera) powder

1 teaspoon grated ginger (optional)

Pinch turmeric powder

Salt to taste 1/3 teaspoon baking soda.

Oil for frying

 

Method

Wash and soak Moong dal for 3-4 hours, then drain the water.

Take care to drain all the water and keep dal as dry as possible.

Grind coarsely, so that dal particles and small pieces remain.

Mix all other ingredients into it.

In case dal is too moist, add a couple of teaspoons of rice or oat flour.  The mixture should be firm, not runny.

Heat oil.  Put in a small ball of dal mixture to ensure readiness. 

Shape mixture into balls, slightly flatten each ball and gently put into the oil.

Fry on medium-high heat till golden brown, turning each ball over so that both sides are a deep golden colour.

Remove vadas onto a platter or thali.

Serve hot with tomato ketchup or chutney.

These vadas taste good even when cooled and are ideal for carrying on a journey.

This is a fantastic breakfast/ brunch dish…good comfort food and very satisfying. Its amazing how you can achieve great taste without wheat or eggs.  If dairy is a no-no, use a combination of soy milk and soft, mashed tofu.  If gluten free bread is not available where you live, use thinly sliced potatoes.  I use SCHAR gluten free baguettes, as they do not contain wheat or eggs and are totally allergen free.  There are other options in the market, but a lot of gluten free products do contain egg and nut ingredients. I  have used cilantro and a tad bit of jalapeno, with sauted onion, but you can alter seasonings……try chives, green onions, basil, thyme, parsley, all equally delicious, in combinations of your choice.

 

hearty ham and cheese bake

 

Serves 2

Ingredients

6 slices of SCHAR gluten free bread (baguette), cut diagonally into longish shapes— or any other gluten free bread

4-6 slices cooked deli ham (Use cooked shredded chicken, cooked sliced turkey breast as ham alternatives) Chop ham slices into small bits

1/2 cup milk

1/2 cup cream

2/3 cup grated cheddar

1/4 cup chopped onion

2 Tablespoons finely cut fresh cilantro leaves

1/2 teaspoon chopped jalapeno, or to taste

2 teaspoons olive oil

1/2 teaspoon chopped fresh garlic (optional)

Salt and pepper to taste

Method

Preheat oven to 375 F

In a small saucepan heat olive oil, add garlic if using it, saute for 10-15 seconds.

Add chopped onion, saute till soft and transparent, then remove from heat and set aside.

Lightly grease a medium baking dish.

In a bowl, whisk milk and cream

Add sauted onion, 1 Tablespoon chopped cilantro and jalapeno.  Reserve 1 tablespoon cilantro for garnish.

Add salt and pepper

Pour half of the liquid mixture over the bread slices

Top with ham bits and half the grated cheese

Repeat layering of bread, milk-cream mixture and grated cheddar cheese

Bake for 35-40 minutes or until golden.  Edges should be slightly browned

Garnish with chopped cilantro.

 

Enjoy!

%d bloggers like this: